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Begley Library Homepage: COVID-19 Vaccination Information

COVID-19 Vaccinations

Important Contact Information 

Student questions can be sent to: studentscovid19@sunysccc.edu or vaccinations@sunysccc.edu

Click here for SUNY Schenectady Student COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic

 

New York State Coronavirus Health Hotline
1-888-364-3065

Schenectady County Public Health Services (SCPHS) Communicable Disease Department
518-386-2824, option 4
After Hours 518-437-7878     
      

 Woman consulting with medical professional about covid vaccine.        Woman receiving covid vaccination from health professional   

Am I Eligible?

Am I eligible?

New York is currently vaccinating Phase 1a and Phase 1b groups. 
Eligible New Yorkers in Phase 1a and 1b are can be found here: 
Phase 1a & Phase 1b eligible New Yorkers
You may also answer questions to see if you are eligible here:
Am I Eligible? (Click Get Started at the bottom of the page to begin.)

How Do I Register?

How do I register?

1. New York State eligibility website: Am I Eligible? (Click Get Started at the bottom of the page to begin.)

2. Through your employer if you are an essential worker in Phase 1b. 

3. With select counties if you have a comorbidity, underlying medical condition, or are over the age of 65.

How is SUNY Schenectady Responding?

CRRSAA Act (formerly the CARES Act) Higher Education Emergency Relief Funding for Students (HEERF II)

SUNY Schenectady has received $2,266,692 from the U.S Department of Education through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act and $5,230,881 Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (CRRSAA). A minimum of $2,266,692 shall be distributed to eligible students who incurred emergency expenses due to coronavirus. Below is the HEERF II application and instructions. Please read the instructions and application carefully before applying.

Priority for this funding is given to students who have exceptional need. The College will review applications on a bi-weekly basis. During each round of review, students with exceptional need are reviewed first. If funding remains, students without exceptional need will be reviewed second. A student having exceptional need can be documented by either (a) submitting a FAFSA to the College or (b) providing an explanation as to why the student has exceptional need.

HEERF II Instructions 

HEERF II Application

HEERF I & HEERF II Facts and Data 

HEERF Institutional Portion Expenditure Report Ending Quarter 12/31/2020
HEERF Institutional Portion Expenditure Report Ending Quarter 9/30/2020

COVID-19 Dashboard

COVID-19 Dashboard

SUNY Schenectady is committed to protecting the safety and health of our community. This chart is to provide our community with up-to-date information on COVID-19 tracking for SUNY Schenectady. All known active cases are self-reported to SUNY Schenectady; as a result, this data is reported to the best of SUNY Schenectady’s knowledge. This chart will be updated daily Monday–Friday by 4:30 p.m.

Last updated February 25, 2021.

Active Cases Total Cases Since March
Total online cases (students & personnel)  0 4
Total on-campus cases (students & personnel)  0 24
Total 0 29

Schenectady County COVID-19 Tracker

New York State COVID-19 Tracker

County Information

County Information:

Schenectady County: COVID-19 Vaccination Information

The availability of appointments is dependent upon how many vaccines New York State receives, and where those vaccines are allocated to. If no appointments are available, continue to check these sources frequently for updated information.

Albany County: Phase 1a & 1b pre-registration

Albany County has information on their vaccination response on their website. Click here.

New York State COVID-19 Vaccine Tracker to see how  many vaccines have been distributed and administered across the state.

You need an appointment. If you visit a location without an appointment and the appropriate verification of your eligibility, you will not receive a vaccine.

Fulton County: COVID-19 Information

Fulton County is part of the Mohawk Valley Regional network and is not scheduling public appointments for vaccine at this time.   The supply for vaccine is not as high as the demand is at this time. The process to vaccinate all individuals will take months.

Montgomery County: COVID-19 Important Information

Montgomery County COVID-19 Vaccine Waitlist Hotline: 518-853-8247

Rensselaer County: COVID-19 Vaccine Information

Rensselaer County is referring residents to the NYS hotline: The NYS COVID-19 Vaccination Hotline is open 7AM - 10PM, 7 days a week, for scheduling vaccination appointments for eligible New Yorkers: 1-833-NYS-4-VAX (1-833-697-4829)

Saratoga County: Potential Vaccine Recipient Interest List

Saratoga County Public Health Services COVID-19 Hotline 518-885-2276. Monday-Friday, 8:30am-4pm. Be sure to include this number in your contact list so it is unblocked and does not appear as SPAM.

Schoharie County: Schoharie County Department of Health

The Department of Health received vaccine to conduct a first dose Vaccination Clinic for Medically Compromised Individuals on Wednesday, March 3, 2021 in the main county office building basement, from 10am to 1pm.

COVID-19 Testing for Students

COVID-19 Testing for Students

Read SUNY Schenectady's full Surveillance Testing Plan

SUNY Schenectady continues to take steps to protect the health and safety of the campus community. Given the recent spikes in COVID-19 cases being reported at our nation’s Colleges and Universities, all students taking at least one on-campus class will be required to submit to a COVID-19 saliva test every week that they are on-campus. This protocol has been adopted at every SUNY campus across the state.

This testing will be mandatory for students and will allow SUNY Schenectady to identify cases among students early on and take steps to prevent further spread of the virus.

What Does the CDC Say About the Vaccine?

CDC COVID-19 Vaccine Key Things to Know

Key Things to Know About COVID-19 Vaccines

Help stop the pandemic by getting vaccinated

What we know

illustrations of vaccine, person wearing a mask, hand washing, and social distancing

Studies show that COVID-19 vaccines are effective at keeping you from getting COVID-19. Experts also think that getting a COVID-19 vaccine may help keep you from getting seriously ill even if you do get COVID-19.

COVID-19 vaccination is an important tool to help us get back to normal. Learn more about the benefits of getting vaccinated.

COVID-19 vaccines teach our immune systems how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19. It typically takes a few weeks after vaccination for the body to build protection (immunity) against the virus that causes COVID-19. That means it is possible a person could still get COVID-19 just after vaccination. This is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection.

There are steps you can take to protect yourself until you can get vaccinated. Even after you get vaccinated it’s important to continue using all the tools available to help stop this pandemic as we learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work in real-world conditions. Even after vaccination, take steps to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

What we do not know

Although COVID-19 vaccines are effective at keeping you from getting sick, scientists are still learning how well vaccines prevent you from spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 to others, even if you do not get sick.

If you are vaccinated against COVID-19, you may still be exposed to the virus that causes COVID-19. After exposure, people can be infected with or “carry” the virus that causes COVID-19 but not feel sick or have any symptoms. Experts call this “asymptomatic infection.”

For this reason, even after vaccination, we need to continue using all the tools available to help stop this pandemic as we learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work in real-world conditions.

COVID-19 vaccines are safe

Millions of people in the United States have received COVID-19 vaccines, and these vaccines have undergone the most intensive safety monitoring in U.S. history. This monitoring includes using both established and new safety monitoring systems to make sure that COVID-19 vaccines are safe. These vaccines cannot give you COVID-19. Learn more facts about COVID-19 vaccines.

CDC has developed a new tool, v-safe, to help us quickly find any safety issues with COVID-19 vaccines. V-safe is a smartphone-based, after-vaccination health checker for people who receive COVID-19 vaccines. Learn how the federal government is working to ensure the safety of COVID-19 vaccines.

You may have side effects after vaccination, but these are normal

After COVID-19 vaccination, you may have some side effects. These are normal signs that your body is building protection. The side effects from COVID-19 vaccination, such as chills or tiredness, may affect your ability to do daily activities, and they should go away in a few days. Learn more about what to expect after getting vaccinated.

In the coming months, vaccines will become widely available

Although the vaccine supply is currently limited, the federal government is working toward making vaccines widely available for everyone at no cost. Learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines get to you and who should get vaccinated first when supplies are limited.

The federal government is providing the vaccine free of charge to people living in the United States. However, your vaccination provider may bill your insurance company, Medicaid, or Medicare for an administration fee. Vaccination providers can be reimbursed for this by the patient’s public or private insurance company or, for uninsured patients, by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Provider Relief Fund. No one can be denied a vaccine if they are unable to pay the vaccine administration fee.

In the coming months, doctors’ offices, retail pharmacies, hospitals, and clinics will offer COVID-19 vaccine. Your doctor’s office or local pharmacy may have contacted you with information about their vaccination plans. Use this tool to find more information on how to get vaccinated in your area:

How Do I Get a Vaccine?

CDC makes recommendations for who should get the vaccine first, then each state makes its own plan.

Choose your state or territory below to find your health department:

COVID-19 vaccines and herd immunity

What we know

vaccine doctor family shield

Herd immunity means that enough people in a community are protected from getting a disease because they’ve already had the disease or because they’ve been vaccinated. Herd immunity makes it hard for the disease to spread from person to person, and it even protects those who cannot be vaccinated, like newborns or people who are allergic to the vaccine. The percentage of people who need to have protection to achieve herd immunity varies by disease.

What we do not know

Experts do not yet know what percentage of people would need to get vaccinated to achieve herd immunity to COVID-19. CDC and other experts are studying herd immunity and will provide more information as it is available.

COVID-19 vaccines and new variants of the virus

CDC is continuing to investigate the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines. Scientists also are working to learn about new variants of the virus. More studies are needed to understand how new variants may affect the effectiveness of existing COVID-19 vaccines.

Our knowledge of the characteristics of new variants is rapidly growing. CDC will share updates as soon as they are available. For more information, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/transmission/variant.html.